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Best Book You Have Ever Read (Not By EC)

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littlems.fowl - 14 July 2012 05:17 PM
WhatsHerName - 14 July 2012 11:49 AM

The Fault In Our Stars by John Green. I know some of you guys may be sick of me talking about him

His stuff is too lovey-dovey for me. I think he’s really good at writing, though, he just doesn’t write my genre (totally blanked on how to spell that for a few minutes XD) of choice.

hmmm… nice title. but lovey dovey? eh. and the genre ( haha LMF! hate that word!) of choice is? and what is the genre of the book?

     
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af-fan - 03 September 1928 10:36 PM

and the genre ( haha LMF! hate that word!) of choice is?

Horror. Or anything that’s really weird. If it leaves me going “what the f**k just happened,” then I’ll probably love it. Like Hitch Hikers’ Guild to the Galaxy. Except that one’s not very random. But still.

     
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littlems.fowl - 29 July 2012 12:45 AM
af-fan - 03 September 1928 10:36 PM

and the genre ( haha LMF! hate that word!) of choice is?

Horror. Or anything that’s really weird. If it leaves me going “what the f**k just happened,” then I’ll probably love it. Like Hitch Hikers’ Guild to the Galaxy. Except that one’s not very random. But still.

haha. Miss perigrines house for peculiar children is a bit scary. i recommend it. and it will leave you with that… appealing thought. cuz in the end they go on a mission and nothing else is said!!!!! like i said before very vague ending but is awesome!

     
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af-fan - 29 July 2012 11:16 AM

haha. Miss perigrines house for peculiar children is a bit scary. i recommend it. and it will leave you with that… appealing thought. cuz in the end they go on a mission and nothing else is said!!!!! like i said before very vague ending but is awesome!

I don’t think you understand. Have you ever watched the movie Mirror Mask? It’s my favourite. You can spend hours analyzing it, but there’s really no point in doing so. It’s weird, bazaar, and spectacular. It’s hard to find a book like that. I’ve read a few, but not too many that are as artistic.

     
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Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling. Lots of humor, fast-paced action, great plot full of twists and turns. Has a cliffhanger at the end, too. You feel like you have to read the next book.

     
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The Broken Window by Jeffery Deaver. He’s my favourite author, and that book was insanely creepy!

     
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Werewolf Rising by R.L. LaFevers was really good. It has been a while since I read it, but I’m glad to have. If your into the paranormal, a good non-fiction on that topic is Dark World by Zak Bagans… If you are into the paranormal and are a fan on Ghost Adventures, it is a definite must read.

     
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WhatsHerName - 14 July 2012 11:49 AM

The Fault In Our Stars by John Green. I know some of you guys may be sick of me talking about him, but I can’t seem to help it…
You can listen to him reading the first chapter:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F_vFvbfn9Fs

and my face right now is just like \(^.^)/

     
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littlems.fowl - 29 July 2012 12:45 AM
af-fan - 03 September 1928 10:36 PM

and the genre ( haha LMF! hate that word!) of choice is?

Horror. Or anything that’s really weird. If it leaves me going “what the f**k just happened,” then I’ll probably love it. Like Hitch Hikers’ Guild to the Galaxy. Except that one’s not very random. But still.

In that case, I recommend The Broken Window by Jeffery Deaver. It’s not really slasher scary, but daaaaamn it got under my skin. Makes you kinda paranoid raspberry

The Broken Window (2008)

Data mining is the industry of the 21st century. Commercial companies collect information about us from thousands of sources—credit cards, loyalty programs, hidden radio tags in products, medical histories, employment and banking records, government filings, and many more—then analyze and sell the data to anyone willing to pay the going rate. Some people approve, citing economic benefits; others worry about the erosion of privacy.
    But no one has been prepared for a new twist: A psychotic killer with access to the country’s biggest data miner—Strategic Systems Datacorp—is using detailed information to work his way into the lives of victims, rape, rob and kill them and then blame unsuspecting innocents for the crimes. The killer’s voluminous knowledge of the victims and his ability to plant damning evidence mean that even the most vocal protests of innocence go ignored by the police and juries.
    The perp has, in short, found a perfect means to literally get away with murder—until one of his fall guys turns out to be Lincoln Rhyme’s cousin, Arthur, who is facing certain conviction for first-degree murder. Though the two Rhymes haven’t had any contact for years, Lincoln agrees to look into the case. In the process he unravels a spider web of crime that the killer, known only as Unknown Subject 522, has woven.
    Rhyme, Amelia Sachs and the cast of the previous Rhyme books find themselves up against their most insidious villain, a man obsessed with collecting—from junk on the street to intimate details about our lives to the ultimate trophy: human lives themselves, which he sees as mere streams of data. This is a man proficient with razors and guns, but whose most dangerous weapon is information, which he wields with ruthless precision against those he targets on whim . . . and against those who try to stop him.
    “How,” Rhyme says, “can you defend yourself against the man who knows everything?”
    As the invisible 522 attacks his pursuers through identity theft and outright torture and murder, the stymied police have to turn to the likely source of the data the killer uses—the eerie and monolithic Strategic Systems Datacorp, headed by the legendary data mining pioneer, Andrew Sterling, whose “mission” is the creation of a global empire based not on politics or money but on information.
    “Knowledge is power,” Sterling continually reminds.
    And for Lincoln Rhyme, the case has an added dimension: Arthur’s reemergence draws him back to his childhood and teen years and forces the criminalist to grapple with a tragedy from his past he has avoided for decades.
    The Broken Window is classic Deaver fare: Taking place over three frantic days, the novel features dozens of twists and turns, fascinating, highly researched details—about identity theft, data mining and threats to privacy, as well as forensic science—and, of course, offers the typical multiple surprise endings the author is known for crafting


I’m all over horror books, but this one just introduced me to a whole new world of weird and scary

     
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@TAQ (my phone makes it hard to delete things from a quote, and I don’t want to take up too much room by inserting the whole thing): That book sounds so cool! I’ll have to look it up sometime. I already have bouts of paranoia about random things, so I should be fun to deal with after reading that XD

     
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jeffery Deaver is a master of misdirection in his books. I’m just finishing up his book XO and I can safely say I did NOT see that coming

     
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I’d have to say Wicked by Gregory Maguire. It’s just such a treat. It’s hard at parts to get into it, and it’s really nothing like the musical (alot more eh…mature) but the way in which the world and characters are described had me hooked. It’s just a real jewel.

     
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So far, the Gone series is amazing! I just finished book 2 (Hunger) IT’S AWESOME!